Dr. Clifford A. Siegfried

Professional Preparation

University of California, Davis, California., Zoology, B.S., 1969

University of California, Davis, California, Ecology, Ph.D., 1974

 

Appointments

Assistant Commissioner for Museums and Director of the New York State Museum, 1998- present

Deputy Director, Research and Collections. New York State Museum, 1995 to 1998;Chief, New York State Biological Survey. New York State Museum , 1992 to 1995;Associate Scientist (Environmental Biology). Biological Survey, New York State Museum, 1979 to 1992; Post-Doctoral Associate, University of California, Davis, CA, 1975-1979

 

Cliff Siegfried has worked in the museum field for nearly 30 years. He was appointed Assistant Commissioner for Museums and Director of the New York State Museum in 1998. In this position he directs the research, collections, education, exhibit, and public programs of the State Museum and the Museum Chartering Office which provides recommendations on applications for Regents Charters for Museums and Historical Societies, regulates museums in New York State and provides advisory services to museums and historical societies. Before his appointment to the Assistant Commissioner position, Dr. Siegfried served as Deputy Director of the State Museum (Research and Collections), Chief Scientist of the New York State Biology Survey, and Environmental Biologist in the Biology Survey. He received his Ph.D. (Ecology) in 1974 and a Bachelor of Sciences (Zoology) in 1969 from the University of California, Davis.

 

Dr. Siegfried worked with other agency representatives and the NYS legislature to draft legislation that created the New York State Biodiversity Institute (NYS BRI - 1993)  The BRI provided more than $3 million  to researchers and resource managers for biodiversity education, conservation and research. He served as board member, executive director and president of the board of the BRI.

 

His research focus on the ecology of  aquatic communities, especially the impacts of environmental perturbation on ecosystem structure and function.  He has investigated the community ecology of, and the impacts of nutrient enrichment (eutrophication) on the structure and dynamics of  plankton and benthos (bottom) communities of lakes and reservoirs. He has investigated the ecology of  rivers in California and New York. Some of his recent riverine work focused on the ecological, especially water quality, impacts of zebra mussels in New York waters. He is one of the most published authorities on the impact of acidification on the ecology of Adirondack lakes and is currently investigating the recovery of acidic lakes.

 

He has published the results of his scientific research in more than 100 articles, books, and reports. He has also presented his research at more than 100 scientific meetings and symposia. He has been awarded more than $2,000,000 in grants and contracts in support of his research and has completed more than $ 11,000,000 in capital appropriations for collection stewardship and gallery renewals. He was responsible for all operations of the New York State Museum.

 

He initiated  the renewal of the New York State Museum galleries – including both it’s history and natural history halls - funded by a $20 million appropriation from New York State. He also headed the planning and design of a new “green” collection storage facility. The collection facility had a $60 million capital appropriation.

 

Dr. Siegfried  worked closely with the museums of New York State to increase public accountability  and improve museum operations. He  instituted a series of trustee training workshops to improve governing boards in New York State.  He also initiated a peer-review program to provide guidance to museums in New York seeking Regents Registration. He lead an effort to revise the regulations governing museums in the state. Dr. Siegfried also drafted legislation that was introduced in the state legislature to provide, for the first time, formula based funding for museums across the state. This legislation also introduced a competitive grants program aimed at improving student achievement in New York.

 

 

REPORTS AND PUBLICATIONS - LAKE GEORGE

 

Siegfried, C.A. 1987. Large-bodied crustacea and rainbow smelt in Lake George, New York: Trophic interactions and phytoplankton community           composition. Journal of Plankton Biology 9:27-39.

 

Siegfried, C.A. and S.O. Quinn. 1986. Lake George Clean Lakes 314 Study (Phase I - Diagnostic/Feasibility Study). Environmental Conservation, Albany, New York. 407pp.

 

Collins, C.D. and C.A. Siegfried. 1985. Bioavailable phosphorus as an alternative to total phosphorus in development of nutrient loading-trophic relationship. Lake and Reservoir Management 1:20-23.

 

Siegfried, C.A. 1985. Dominance by blue-green algae in an oligotrophic lake: Interaction of nutrient availability and trophic relations in structuring a phytoplankton community. Lake and Reservoir Management 1:108-112.

 

Siegfried, C.A. 1985. Life history, population dynamics, and production of Pontoporeia hoyi (Crustacea, Amphipoda) in relation to the trophic gradient of Lake George, New York. Hydrobiologia 122: 175-180.

 

Bloomfield, J.A., J.W. Sutherland, J. Swart, and C.A.  Siegfried. 1984. Surface runoff water quality from developed areas surrounding a recreational lake. Lake and Reservoir Management, Proc. Third International Symposium on Lake and Reservoir Management. North American Lake Management Society p40-47.

 

Siegfried, C.A. 1983. Dynamics of the crustacean zooplankton of Lake George; or, there's a rainbow over Lake George but where's the pot of gold? In; C.D. Collins (ed.), The Lake George Ecosystem, Lake George Assoc., Lake George, New York. 3: 13-23.

 

Collins, C.D., C.A. Siegfried, and C.A. Surash. 1983. Factors affecting productivity in Lake George eastern embayments. In; C.D. Collins (ed.),The Lake George Ecosystem, Lake George Assoc., Lake George, New York. 3:25-36.

 

Kopache, M.E. and C.A. Siegfried. 1982. Notes on the ecology of Mysis relicta in Lake George. In; M. Schadler (ed.), The Lake George Ecosystem, Lake George Assoc., Lake George, New York. 2: 49-61.

 

Siegfried, C.A. 1982. Water quality and phytoplankton of Lake George, New York: Urban storm runoff and water quality gradients. New York State Dept. Environmental Conservation, Albany, New York. Technical Paper No. 66. 64pp.

 

Siegfried, C.A. 1982. Lake George benthos community dynamics: Life history and production of Pontoporeia hoyi. In; M. Schadler (ed.), The Lake George Ecosystem, Lake George Assoc., Lake George, New York. 2: 27-39.

 

Siegfried, C.A. 1981. Phytoplankton of Lake George: seasonal and geographic patterns. In; C.W. Boylen (ed.), The Lake George Ecosystem, Lake George Assoc., Lake George, New York. p. 223-236.

 

 

REPORTS AND PUBLICATIONS - OTHER NEW YORK LAKES

 

 

Carling, K.J., T.B. Mihuc, C.A. Siegfried, R.E. Bonham and F. Dunlap. 2004 .Where have all the rotifers gone: long term patterns in Lake Champlain zooplankton communities 1990-2001. pp. 259-270. In, T. Manley, P. Manley, T.B. Mihuc, (ed.) Lake Champlain Partnerships and Research  in the New Millennium, Kluwer Acad, Press.

 

Mathews, D.A., S.W. Effler, C.W. Mathews (Brooks), C.A. Siegfried and M.E. Spada. 2001. Responses of Onondaga Lake, New York to early stages of rehabilitation: Unanticipated ecosystem feedbacks.  Water Environ. Res. 73: 691-703.

 

Martin, M.M., M. DeAngelo, … C. A. Siegfried, . . 1998.  The State of Upper Saranac Lake. Report to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. New York State Dept. Environmental Conservation. Albany, New York. 322 pp.

 

Walrath, L.R., C.A. Siegfried, and S.O. Quinn. 1997. Environmental factors affecting the distribution and abundance of burrowing nymphs of the mayfly, Hexigenia limbata, in Lake Champlain, New York. NYS Freshwater Research Institute Environmental Studies Report 97-1. 36 pp.

 

Siegfried, C.A., N.A. Auer, and S.W. Effler. 1996. Zooplankton Biology.  p 421 - 436. In; S.W. Effler (ed.),Limnological and Engineering  Analysis of a Polluted Urban lake. Engineering Analysis, Springler-Verlag, NY

 

Siegfried, C.A., N.A. Auer, and S.W. Effler. 1996. Changes in the zooplankton of Onondaga Lake: causes and implications. Lake and Reservoir Management 12: 59 –71

 

Siegfried, C. A. and S. O. Quinn. 1995. Long-term water quality and biological monitoring program for Lake Champlain. Interim Report to Lake Champlain Management Conference. NYS Freshwater Research Institute Environmental Studies Report 95-1. 113 pp.

 

Kahn, AQ.L., L.R. Walrath, C.A. Siegfried. And S. O. Quinn. 1994. Composition and diversity of the zoobenthos of six embayments of Lake Champalin, New York-Vermont. NYS Freshwater Research Institute Environmental Studies Report 94-1. 27 pp.

 

Siegfried, C.A. and J.W. Sutherland. 1992. Zooplankton communities of Adirondack lakes: Changes in community structure associated with acidification. J. Freshwater Ecology 7: 97-112.

 

Siegfried, C.A. 1991. The pelagic rotifer community of an acidic clearwater lake in the Adirondack Mountains of New York State. Archiv fur Hydrobiologie 122: 441-462.

 

Siegfried, C.A., S.O. Quinn, J.A. Bloomfield, and J.W. Sutherland. 1990. Chemistry of Adirondack lakes in relation to acidification. In, Sutherland et al, Final Report to USEPA/NCSU Acid Deposition Program.

 

Sutherland, J.W., J.A. Bloomfield, and C.A. Siegfried. 1990. Acidity status and crustacean community structure in 50 Adirondack lakes and ponds. In, Sutherland et al, Final Report to USEPA/NCSU Acid Deposition Program.

 

Sutherland, J.W., S.O. Quinn, J.A. Bloomfield, and C. A. Siegfried. 1990. A long-term ecosystem-monitoring program for waters sensitive to acidification. In, Sutherland et al., Final Report to USEPA/NCSU Acid Deposition Program.

 

Siegfried, C.A., J.A. Bloomfield, and J.W. Sutherland. 1989. Planktonic rotifer community structure in Adirondack lakes: Effects of acidity, trophic status, and related water quality characteristics. Hydrobiologia 175: 33-48.

 

Siegfried, C.A., J.A. Bloomfield, and J.W. Sutherland. 1989. Acidity status and phytoplankton species richness, standing crop, and community composition in Adirondack lakes. Hydrobiologia 175: 13-32.

 

Siegfried, C.A. and J.W. Sutherland. 1989. Empirical prediction of zooplankton biomass in Adirondack lakes. Lake and Reservoir Management 5: 91-97.

 

Siegfried, C.A. 1988. Planktonic indicators of lake acidification in the Adirondack region of New York State. Lake and Reservoir Management 4(1): 115-121.

 

Siegfried, C.A., J.A. Bloomfield, and J.W. Sutherland. 1987. Acidification, vertebrate, and invertebrate predators and the structure of zooplankton communities in Adirondack lakes. Lake and Reservoir Management 3: 385-393.

 

Siegfried, C.A., J.W. Sutherland, and S.O. Quinn. 1987. Plankton community response to the chemical neutralization of three acidified waters in the Adirondack mountain region of New York State. Lake and Reservoir Management 3: 444-451.

 

Siegfried, C.A., J.W. Sutherland, and J.A. Bloomfield. 1987. Analysis of plankton community structure in Adirondack lakes in relation to acidification. In, R. Perry, R.M. Harrison, J.N.B. Bell, and J.N. Lester, (ed.). Acid Rain: Scientific and Technical Advances. Selper   Ltd., London. p445-450.

 

Siegfried. C.A. 1985. Post-neutralization plankton communities of Bone Pond, Franklin County, New York. NYS Dept. Environmental Conservation Technical Report No. 71,  24pp.

 

Siegfried, C.A. 1985. The phytoplankton of Lake Myosotis: Limiting nutrients and community dynamics. Final Report to the E.N. Huyck Preserve Foundation, 26 pp.

 

Siegfried, C.A., J.W. Sutherland, S.O. Quinn, and J.A. Bloomfield. 1984. Lake acidification and the biology of Adirondack lakes I. Rotifer communities. Verhangen International Verein Limnology 22: 549-558.

 

Sutherland, J.W., S.O. Quinn, J.A. Bloomfield, and C.A. Siegfried. 1984. Lake acidification and the biology of Adirondack lakes II. Crustacean zooplankton. Lake and Reservoir Management, Proc. Third International Symposium on Lake and Reservoir Management. North  American Lake Management Society p380-384.

 

Siegfried, C.A. 1984. Why is Lake Myosotis so green ? Edmund Niles Huyck Preserve Newsletter, Fall Issue. p1-3.

 

Sutherland, J.W. and C.A. Siegfried. 1984. Field surveys of biota and selected water chemistry parameters in acidified waters of the Adirondack mountain region of New York State. Research Summary, Aquatic Effects Task Group Peer Review, NCSU Acid Deposition Program, Asheville, North Carolina. p239-246.